July 4th, 2013 Portland Fireworks Show @ Waterfront Blues Festival | Largest Display in Oregon, 22 Minutes, 11,800 Shots

Waterfront Blues Festival Fireworks Show
July 4th, 2013
10PM | More info: waterfrontbluesfest.com

Tom McCall Waterfront Park
SW Naito Pkwy Portland, OR 97204
(803) 523-2223

Oregon Food Bank’s Waterfront Blues Festival celebrates the Fourth of July each year with a spectacular display of fireworks … the largest July 4 fireworks display in Oregon. Fireworks start at 10 p.m., after the evening’s final performance and the National Anthem, performed by Linda Hornbuckle.

Entry
Entry to the Safeway Waterfront Blues Festival, including the fireworks show, is a donation of $10 (or more) plus two cans (or more) of nonperishable food, or your purchased festival pass. Learn more about festival entry and passes.

100 percent of all donations benefit Oregon Food Bank’s mission: to eliminate hunger and its root causes … because no one should be hungry.

Simulcast by KINK.fm
Western Display Fireworks will fire the 2013 firework display from a barge on the Willamette River. Western Display choreographs the show to the tempo and intensity of a soundtrack produced and simulcast by KINK.fm 101.9. The 22-minute-show will include 11,800 shots.

Five-generation family business
Since 1992, when Oregon Food Bank added fireworks to its Waterfront Blues Festival, Western Display Fireworks has produced the display with Bob Gobet, company owner, as the lead pyro-technician. The five-generation family business, located in Canby, Ore., originated in 1948 and has been producing fireworks shows for more than 60 years in the Northwest and around the United States.

The 2011 Waterfront Blues Festival Fireworks Finale

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WHAT TO BRING

  • $10 donation plus two cans of food per person per day (or the special festival pass you purchased online). Passes required for Sensational Sunday, July 7, 2013.
  • LOW “sand” or “beach” style chair – not more than 30-inches high. Higher chairs must sit in back to avoid obstructing the view for others.
  • Maximum blanket size: For two people, 6’ x 8’; For four people, 8’ x 12’
  • Maximum cooler size: 22” long, 15” high, 15” wide
  • Water
  • Sunscreen
  • Hat and sunglasses
  • Rain poncho if it’s sprinkling
  • Ear plugs for sensitive ears

LEAVE AT HOME (NOT ALLOWED)

  • NO large tarps allowed into the bowl
  • No animals. You won’t be allowed to enter the festival with dogs, cats, ferrets, snakes, elephants or any pet or animal.
  • No alcoholic beverages (You can purchase beer or wine onsite)
  • No glass
  • No fireworks
  • No weapons
  • No beach balls or Frisbees
  • No tents or shade canopies
  • No sun umbrellas that obstruct seated guests’ view of stages
  • No location flags/signs on sticks or poles that block view of seated guests
  • No audio or video recording devices

AVAILABLE ON SITE

  • ATM
  • First-aid tent
  • Bicycle parking
  • A variety of food and beverages for purchase from vendors
  • CDs, posters, clothing, buttons and other merchandise for purchase. All proceeds from merchandise sales at the festival benefit Oregon Food Bank.
  • Bottled water for purchase, a portion of the proceeds benefit Oregon Food Bank
  • Pottery at Oregon Potters Association Empty Bowls Booth

PARKING

Street parking fills quickly. Here are a few alternatives:

  • Park in downtown parking lots and garages. We recommend SmartPark or City Center Parking Garages.
  • Park on the east bank of the river and walk across the Hawthorne Bridge.
  • Or walk along the East Bank Esplanade.
  • The festival provides two areas for parking bicycles: one on Naito near the main entrance and one at the north end of the festival near the Hawthorne Bridge entry.
  • Ride TriMet, MAX light rail or the Portland Street Car

ACCESSIBILITY

  • The festival site is a public park. The walkway is wheelchair accessible and there is a wheelchair seating area at the top of the bowl. But most of the park is a grassy hill. There is no special festival parking. Attendees park in public lots and on the street. The closest parking garage is at S.W. First and Jefferson, just a few blocks from the festival site.

OTHER COMMON SENSE POLICIES

  • Keep passages free. Don’t block aisles, walkways, esplanade or other public areas.
  • Dispose of trash in designated receptacles.
  • Beer cups are compostable. Dispose of your empty beer cup in designated receptacles.
  • No distribution of commercial advertisements.
  • Waterfront Blues Festival staff will close entry to Waterfront Park when the audience reaches capacity, as directed by the City of Portland Fire Marshall.
  • Obey all federal, state and City of Portland laws, ordinances, rules and regulations.
  • Do not enter nonpublic areas, i.e. offices, storage, vendor booths, “performers only.”
  • Respect property. Don’t take, deface, degrade, damage or destroy property.
  • Don’t disrupt or interfere with festival operations.
  • No physical or verbal harassment or abuse allowed.
  • Obey directions of festival management team and its authorized contractors.
  • No video or audio recording of concerts without permission from artist.

ABOUT OREGON FOOD BANK
Oregon Food Bank believes no one should be hungry. With sufficient public will and support of the entire community, we believe it is possible to eliminate hunger and its root causes.

Since 1982, Oregon Food Bank has been leading the fight against hunger in Oregon and southwest Washington by collecting and distributing food through a network of four OFB branches and 16 independent regional food banks.

The OFB Network helps nearly 1 in 5 households fend off hunger. OFB also leads statewide efforts to increase resources for hungry families and to eliminate the root causes of hunger through advocacy, nutrition education, garden education, and helping communities strengthen local food systems.